Friday, December 9, 2016

The Blue Bag Of Happiness

 

I am curious about the blue bag syndrome. Many manufacturers seem to make them - in varying shades and textures. I have two of them myself by different makers. I cannot say why they should be blue rather than brown, purple, red, or green. I could understand if they were bright yellow or orange for use in snow conditions or at night, but the other colours puzzle me.

Well, that aside, this Photo Hatch II Aw from Lowepro is a pretty good choice for the sorts of people who wear backpacks - and I don't mean to sound funny saying that. Let me explain:

Backpacks can come in all sizes and shapes but some of the most common ones are Too Big, Too Small, Too Floppy, and Too Stiff. The people who choose them are either confronted with inappropriate carrying capacity, awkward fit, or downright pain as hard edges dig into them. The idea for which the pack has been bought frequently goes out the window as wrestling with it overtakes all other considerations. In some cases the bag acts as a buffet for the thieves of the area and in others even the owner of the thing cannot get inside to get the camera out.

 

Like Baby Bear's porridge, this Lowepro bag has nothing too extreme - it would suit most hikers in most day situations. While you'd not select it to haul all your camping gear for an arctic yomp, you can make day trips into rain forests and deserts quite well with it. It would not be an unreasonable size to carry for an urban expedition, either. In this latter role, perhaps the blue colour has been chosen to let it look a bit less imposing.

 

It's the basic top general storage and bottom camera storage that we have seen so many times from Lowepro. In this case the designers have chosen to allow access to the top from a general zip over the crown of the bag but have adopted the strategy that they used in their Flipside series - a zipped flap to access the cameras that can only be opened when the pack is off the body. This is also known as the South American security design.

 

It is also rip-stop fabric with a full weather cover stored under the base of the bag. There is a tablet, papers pouch at the most vulnerable part of the rear face, so you might need to monitor your surroundings. Losing your sandwiches and jumper is one thing but your devices and passport is another.


One feature I did like is extremely simple - there is a reflective panel set into an accessory strap on the rear face. Whether you loop something through there or not you can at least be seen hiking on a highway for a considerable distance if vehicle lights pick up that patch.

Also note one more thing on that patch photo; the stitching. Even, spaced, a good margin, and hemmed edges. This is the good stuff, folks.


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2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

That little reflective panel looks like the spot where you feed the tube through for a water blabber (Camelback) type system.

December 9, 2016 at 11:34 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oops - bladder not blabber!
I'll stop my blabbering now...

December 9, 2016 at 11:36 AM  

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The Blue Bag Of Happiness

 

I am curious about the blue bag syndrome. Many manufacturers seem to make them - in varying shades and textures. I have two of them myself by different makers. I cannot say why they should be blue rather than brown, purple, red, or green. I could understand if they were bright yellow or orange for use in snow conditions or at night, but the other colours puzzle me.

Well, that aside, this Photo Hatch II Aw from Lowepro is a pretty good choice for the sorts of people who wear backpacks - and I don't mean to sound funny saying that. Let me explain:

Backpacks can come in all sizes and shapes but some of the most common ones are Too Big, Too Small, Too Floppy, and Too Stiff. The people who choose them are either confronted with inappropriate carrying capacity, awkward fit, or downright pain as hard edges dig into them. The idea for which the pack has been bought frequently goes out the window as wrestling with it overtakes all other considerations. In some cases the bag acts as a buffet for the thieves of the area and in others even the owner of the thing cannot get inside to get the camera out.

 

Like Baby Bear's porridge, this Lowepro bag has nothing too extreme - it would suit most hikers in most day situations. While you'd not select it to haul all your camping gear for an arctic yomp, you can make day trips into rain forests and deserts quite well with it. It would not be an unreasonable size to carry for an urban expedition, either. In this latter role, perhaps the blue colour has been chosen to let it look a bit less imposing.

 

It's the basic top general storage and bottom camera storage that we have seen so many times from Lowepro. In this case the designers have chosen to allow access to the top from a general zip over the crown of the bag but have adopted the strategy that they used in their Flipside series - a zipped flap to access the cameras that can only be opened when the pack is off the body. This is also known as the South American security design.

 

It is also rip-stop fabric with a full weather cover stored under the base of the bag. There is a tablet, papers pouch at the most vulnerable part of the rear face, so you might need to monitor your surroundings. Losing your sandwiches and jumper is one thing but your devices and passport is another.


One feature I did like is extremely simple - there is a reflective panel set into an accessory strap on the rear face. Whether you loop something through there or not you can at least be seen hiking on a highway for a considerable distance if vehicle lights pick up that patch.

Also note one more thing on that patch photo; the stitching. Even, spaced, a good margin, and hemmed edges. This is the good stuff, folks.


Labels: , , , , , , , ,